I wish that I could lend out some of my self esteem to people who need it. I can always make myself more. 

afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…
The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.
Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.
acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”
here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

Holy fucking shite. What is it with [white] people’s obsession with making history less interesting? 

afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…


The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.

Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.

Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.

After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.

Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.

After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.

Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.

Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.

Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.

Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.

The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.

Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.

Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.

acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”

here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

Holy fucking shite. What is it with [white] people’s obsession with making history less interesting? 

Sunday, July 27, 2014
Rooney Manlove. 

Rooney. Manlove.

TRY HARDER NEXT TIME

Rooney Manlove. 

Rooney. Manlove.

TRY HARDER NEXT TIME

Saturday, July 26, 2014
Japanese eggplant at the farmer’a market this morning.  (at Boone Farmers Market @ Horn in the West)

Japanese eggplant at the farmer’a market this morning. (at Boone Farmers Market @ Horn in the West)

Thursday, July 24, 2014
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The Human League ▬ Don’t You Want Me (Top Of The Pops, 1981)

My new boyfriend, Philip Oakey

Thursday, July 17, 2014

donutsornonuts:

We are gathered here today because SOMEBODY *glares at coffin* couldn’t stay alive.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

mysticlionzion:

flywithyourspirit:

Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli classics on Zippo lighters 

Buy here x x  

So coooool

nomorewaterthefirenexttime:

lovelylavenderchild:

talesofscienceandlove:

Quvenzhané Wallis on set while shooting the new Fall/Winter campaign for Armani Junior 2014 (video).

So adorable

ok but we’re gonna need her in the future for a janelle monae biopic

I CANT

a simplified guide to sexualities

homosexual: sexually attracted to homer simpson
pansexual: gets off to various kitchen utensils
asexual: gets turned on by the first letter of the latin alphabet
demisexual: sexually attracted to you if and only if your blood is half divine
bisexual: can only have sex with two people ever. choose wisely
heterosexual: can only be satisfied by macklemore

baby's first words

baby: d-d-da..
father: daddy?
baby: david bowie

pemsylvania:

proton, neutron, electron and crouton 

Saturday, July 12, 2014

You can go ahead and call me a professional frugal shopper because I just got this kickass $200 navy wool blazer from J.Crew for $45. Other finds that I would say cement my status of professional frugal shopper are two pairs of Allen Edmonds shoes (one in perfect condition, one needs resoling) for $13 and $4, respectively, about 10 ties including brands such as Oscar de la Renta, Yves Saint Laurent and Liberty of London that I spent no greater than $8 apiece on (and typically $1-3), two band new Ralph Lauren button down shirts for a whopping $2.50 apiece, a pair of new black Levi’s 511 jeans for $5, and three Dooney & Bourke All-Weather Leather purses for less than $30 for all three. Am I bragging? Yes. Do I care? No. OH GOSH and I almost forgot the fabulous Audrey Hepburn-esque black and white dress that I got at Anthropologie for $20… on sale from $200. I may be kind of addicted to shopping but like… so many nice things for so cheap. Ugh. 

 
OLDER THINGS